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Out for blood

Seventy certified so far at Iowa Lakes Community College in Stop the Bleed

July 18, 2017
Amy H. Peterson - Staff Writer (apeterson@esthervillenews.net) , Estherville News

By Amy H. Peterson

Staff Writer

"By learning these basic skills, you may save a life," said instructor Miranda DePyper, EMS, Fire and Health Services programmer.

Article Photos

The Friday Stop the Bleed class at Iowa Lakes Community Colleges included staff from administration, maintenance and other areas.

"The goal is to get everyone certified," DePyper said.

Stop the Bleed was launched in October of 2015 by the White House, Stop the Bleed is a national awareness campaign and a call to action. The program is intended to cultivate grassroots efforts that encourage bystanders to become trained, equipped, and empowered to help in a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives.

Fact Box

"No matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the blood loss.

-Miranda DePyper, EMS, Fire and Health Services

programmer at Iowa Lakes Community College

DePyper said, "No matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the blood loss. Those nearest to someone with life threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care."

According to a recent National Academies of Science study, trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 46.

Participants learned the proper way to use a tourniquet.

"Does this hurt? Yes. Do we do it anyway? Yes. Because even damage to an arm or a leg is preferable to the person not being here anymore," DePyper said.

In a trauma situation in which a bystander needs to stop the bleeding any way possible, the standard is to sort of MacGyver anything on hand to stop the bleeding, and apply as much pressure as possible.

Pork shoulders and an IV bag of red-colored fluid provided the hands-on skill test of stopping the bleeding. An IV line was run through a pork shoulder covered in denim jeans to simulate wounded human flesh.

Gauze, cotton, even maxi pads and tampons were lain on the table for students to try in their attempts to stop the blood flow, while trying to apply pressure to the right points.

Sonia Castillo smiled after her quick work stopped the bleeding.

Others found it more challenging. The pork shoulder exercise was optional, and some in the class appeared to be uncomfortable in the presence of even fake blood.

Each supervisor at Iowa Lakes will have a Stop the Bleed bag, and the college is purchasing Stop the Bleed wall mounted blood control kits for various locations at each campus.

"It's something you hope you never need, but could be useful in case of an active shooter, if someone cuts themselves in the lab or kitchen, or for other kinds of accidents," DePyper said.

Workplaces and other groups can set up a class through DePyper, and get more information at bleedingcontrol.org.

 
 
 

 

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